Drug Dosage Calculation Exam 12

Practice Mode

Welcome to your Drug Dosage Calculation Exam 12 ! This exam is carefully curated to help you consolidate your knowledge and gain deeper understanding on the topic.

 

βœ” Exam Details

  • Number of Questions: 10 items
  • Mode: Practice Mode

βœ” Exam Instructions

  1. Practice Mode: This mode aims to facilitate effective learning and review.
  2. Instant Feedback: After each question, the correct answer along with an explanation will be revealed. This is to help you understand the reasoning behind the correct answer, helping to reinforce your learning.
  3. Time Limit: There is no time limit for this exam. Take your time to understand each question and the corresponding choices.

βœ” Tips For Success

  • Read each question carefully. Take your time and don't rush.
  • Understand the rationale behind each answer. This will not only help you during this exam, but also assist in reinforcing your learning.
  • Don't be discouraged by incorrect answers. Use them as an opportunity to learn and improve.
  • Take breaks if you need them. It's not a race, and your understanding is what's most important.
  • Keep a positive attitude and believe in your ability to succeed.

Remember, this exam is not just a test of your knowledge, but also an opportunity to enhance your understanding and skills. Enjoy the learning journey!

 

Click 'Start Exam' when you're ready to begin. Best of luck!

πŸ’‘ Hint

First, remember that 1 gram equals 1000 milligrams. Then, convert the ordered dose from grams to milligrams and determine how many milliliters of the solution will provide the correct dose, given the concentration of the available medication.

1 / 10

1. In the midst of her afternoon rounds, Nurse Alice receives a new medication order for her patient. It calls for 0.25g of Tetracycline. On checking the medication cabinet, Alice sees that the available Tetracycline solution contains 50mg per mL. As she prepares to draw the medication, she questions, "How many mL's of this solution will I need to administer to deliver the ordered dose?"

πŸ’‘ Hint

To calculate the correct rate of flow, first determine the volume to be infused per minute. Then use the drip factor of your IV tubing (in this case, 15gtt/min) to calculate the flow rate in drops per minute.

2 / 10

2. Nurse George is getting ready to start an IV infusion for a patient. The physician's order is to administer 1000 mL of D5W over the next eight hours. The IV tubing George is using delivers 15gtt/min. As he's setting up the IV, he wonders, "What should be the correct rate of flow for this infusion?"

πŸ’‘ Hint

Consider the total volume of the medication to be administered (50 mL), the time period for its administration (30 minutes), and the drop factor of the IV tubing (15 gtts/mL). Calculate how many drops per minute would be needed to administer the total volume over the given time.

3 / 10

3. Early in the morning, Nurse Jackson is preparing the 10am medications for his patient. Included in the schedule is Keflex, 1.5 G mixed in 50 mL of a 5% Dextrose solution. The pharmacy suggests administering this preparation over a thirty-minute period. Jackson notices the IV tubing on his unit delivers 15 gtts per milliliter. As he sets up the IV, Jackson ponders, "What should be the correct rate of flow in drops per minute for this infusion?"

πŸ’‘ Hint

To find the infusion rate, divide the total volume of the solution by the total time of infusion. The rate is typically measured in mL/hour.

4 / 10

4. Nurse Sandra is reviewing a new order for her patient. The instruction is to infuse 500 ml of 5% Dextrose in Normal Saline, with an additional 20 MEq of KCl added to the solution, over the next four hours. As she prepares the solution and sets the IV pump, Sandra wonders, "What should be the appropriate infusion rate for this order in mL/hour?"

πŸ’‘ Hint

With the given time frame from the pharmacy, calculate how many milliliters should be infused per hour. This infusion rate is usually measured in mL/hour.

5 / 10

5. Nurse Mason is on morning rounds when he reaches a patient scheduled for 10am medications. Among these is Keflex, 1.5 G in 50 mL of a 5% Dextrose solution. The pharmacy recommends that this preparation be administered over thirty minutes. As he adjusts the IV pump, Mason ponders, "To ensure correct dosage delivery, what should the IV pump's infusion rate be in mL/hour?"

πŸ’‘ Hint

To determine the correct rate, you should first convert the mL/hour rate into mL/min. Then, apply the drop factor (gtt/mL) of the tubing to find the flow rate in gtt/min.

6 / 10

6. Nurse Olivia is taking care of a patient who has been admitted due to a head injury. The physician's order stipulates that the patient should receive D5NS at a rate of 25 mL/hour. The available IV tubing in the unit has a calibration of 10gtt/mL. As Olivia prepares to adjust the IV flow, she wonders, "What should be the correct rate of flow for this patient, expressed in drops per minute?"

πŸ’‘ Hint

Start by calculating how many milliliters per minute need to be infused, given the pharmacy's recommendation. Then, use the drip factor of the tubing to calculate the rate in drops per minute.

7 / 10

7. Nurse Lisa is in the middle of her morning medication round. Today's 10am schedule for her patient includes Keflex, 2.0 g mixed with 100 mL of a 5% Dextrose solution. The pharmacy guidance is to infuse this preparation over thirty minutes. Her unit's IV tubing delivers 10 gtts per milliliter. As she prepares the infusion, Lisa wonders, "What should the correct rate of flow be in drops per minute?"

πŸ’‘ Hint

Given the administration time frame, calculate how many milliliters need to be infused per hour. The infusion rate is typically measured in mL/hour.

8 / 10

8. Nurse Jake is attending to a patient who has an order to receive an infusion of 100 mL of D51/2NS with 10MEq of KCl. The infusion is supposed to be administered over the next thirty minutes. As Jake prepares to set the IV pump, he ponders, "What should be the correct infusion rate in mL/hour for this medication?"

πŸ’‘ Hint

Begin by calculating the number of hours for the infusion. Then determine how many milliliters should be infused each hour to meet the physician's order.

9 / 10

9. It's late afternoon and Nurse David is preparing to start an IV infusion for his patient. The physician has ordered a D5W solution, 1000 ml to be infused over the coming eight hours. As David programs the IV pump, he asks himself, "What is the appropriate infusion rate I should set the IV pump to in mL/hour?"

πŸ’‘ Hint

To find the correct rate, first calculate how many milliliters per minute should be infused based on the physician's order and the duration of infusion. Then, use the drip factor of the tubing to find the rate in gtt/min.

10 / 10

10. Nurse Hannah is in the middle of her afternoon shift when she receives an order from the physician for an IV infusion. The patient is to receive 1000 ml of D5W solution over the next eight hours. The IV tubing she has on hand delivers 10 gtt/ml. As Hannah prepares the IV, she wonders, "What should be the correct rate of flow in drops per minute?"

Exam Mode

Welcome to your Drug Dosage Calculation Exam 12 This exam is carefully designed to provide you with a realistic test-taking experience, preparing you for the pressures of an actual nursing exam.

 

βœ” Exam Details

  • Number of Questions: 10 items
  • Mode: Exam Mode

βœ” Exam Instructions

  1. Exam Mode: This mode is intended to simulate the environment of an actual exam. Questions and choices will be presented one at a time.
  2. Time Limit: Each question must be answered within 90 seconds. The entire exam should be completed within 15 minutes.
  3. Feedback and Grading: Upon completion of the exam, you will be able to see your grade and the correct answers to all questions. This will allow you to evaluate your performance and understand areas for improvement.

βœ” Tips For Success

  • Read each question carefully. You have 90 seconds per question, so make sure you understand the question before selecting your answer.
  • Pace yourself. Remember, you have 15 minutes in total, so try to maintain a steady rhythm.
  • Focus on one question at a time. Try not to worry about the questions to come.
  • Stay calm under pressure. Use your knowledge and trust your instincts.
  • Remember, it's not just about the score, but about the learning process.

This exam is not only a measurement of your current understanding, but also a valuable learning tool to prepare you for your future nursing career. Click 'Start Exam' when you're ready to begin. Good luck!

1 / 10

1. Nurse Hannah is in the middle of her afternoon shift when she receives an order from the physician for an IV infusion. The patient is to receive 1000 ml of D5W solution over the next eight hours. The IV tubing she has on hand delivers 10 gtt/ml. As Hannah prepares the IV, she wonders, "What should be the correct rate of flow in drops per minute?"

2 / 10

2. Nurse Mason is on morning rounds when he reaches a patient scheduled for 10am medications. Among these is Keflex, 1.5 G in 50 mL of a 5% Dextrose solution. The pharmacy recommends that this preparation be administered over thirty minutes. As he adjusts the IV pump, Mason ponders, "To ensure correct dosage delivery, what should the IV pump's infusion rate be in mL/hour?"

3 / 10

3. Nurse Olivia is taking care of a patient who has been admitted due to a head injury. The physician's order stipulates that the patient should receive D5NS at a rate of 25 mL/hour. The available IV tubing in the unit has a calibration of 10gtt/mL. As Olivia prepares to adjust the IV flow, she wonders, "What should be the correct rate of flow for this patient, expressed in drops per minute?"

4 / 10

4. Nurse Sandra is reviewing a new order for her patient. The instruction is to infuse 500 ml of 5% Dextrose in Normal Saline, with an additional 20 MEq of KCl added to the solution, over the next four hours. As she prepares the solution and sets the IV pump, Sandra wonders, "What should be the appropriate infusion rate for this order in mL/hour?"

5 / 10

5. Early in the morning, Nurse Jackson is preparing the 10am medications for his patient. Included in the schedule is Keflex, 1.5 G mixed in 50 mL of a 5% Dextrose solution. The pharmacy suggests administering this preparation over a thirty-minute period. Jackson notices the IV tubing on his unit delivers 15 gtts per milliliter. As he sets up the IV, Jackson ponders, "What should be the correct rate of flow in drops per minute for this infusion?"

6 / 10

6. Nurse Lisa is in the middle of her morning medication round. Today's 10am schedule for her patient includes Keflex, 2.0 g mixed with 100 mL of a 5% Dextrose solution. The pharmacy guidance is to infuse this preparation over thirty minutes. Her unit's IV tubing delivers 10 gtts per milliliter. As she prepares the infusion, Lisa wonders, "What should the correct rate of flow be in drops per minute?"

7 / 10

7. Nurse George is getting ready to start an IV infusion for a patient. The physician's order is to administer 1000 mL of D5W over the next eight hours. The IV tubing George is using delivers 15gtt/min. As he's setting up the IV, he wonders, "What should be the correct rate of flow for this infusion?"

8 / 10

8. It's late afternoon and Nurse David is preparing to start an IV infusion for his patient. The physician has ordered a D5W solution, 1000 ml to be infused over the coming eight hours. As David programs the IV pump, he asks himself, "What is the appropriate infusion rate I should set the IV pump to in mL/hour?"

9 / 10

9. In the midst of her afternoon rounds, Nurse Alice receives a new medication order for her patient. It calls for 0.25g of Tetracycline. On checking the medication cabinet, Alice sees that the available Tetracycline solution contains 50mg per mL. As she prepares to draw the medication, she questions, "How many mL's of this solution will I need to administer to deliver the ordered dose?"

10 / 10

10. Nurse Jake is attending to a patient who has an order to receive an infusion of 100 mL of D51/2NS with 10MEq of KCl. The infusion is supposed to be administered over the next thirty minutes. As Jake prepares to set the IV pump, he ponders, "What should be the correct infusion rate in mL/hour for this medication?"

Text Mode

Text ModeΒ – Text version of the exam

Questions

1. Nurse Lisa is in the middle of her morning medication round. Today’s 10am schedule for her patient includes Keflex, 2.0 g mixed with 100 mL of a 5% Dextrose solution. The pharmacy guidance is to infuse this preparation over thirty minutes. Her unit’s IV tubing delivers 10 gtts per milliliter. As she prepares the infusion, Lisa wonders, “What should the correct rate of flow be in drops per minute?”

2. It’s late afternoon and Nurse David is preparing to start an IV infusion for his patient. The physician has ordered a D5W solution, 1000 ml to be infused over the coming eight hours. As David programs the IV pump, he asks himself, “What is the appropriate infusion rate I should set the IV pump to in mL/hour?”

3. Nurse Hannah is in the middle of her afternoon shift when she receives an order from the physician for an IV infusion. The patient is to receive 1000 ml of D5W solution over the next eight hours. The IV tubing she has on hand delivers 10 gtt/ml. As Hannah prepares the IV, she wonders, “What should be the correct rate of flow in drops per minute?”

4. Nurse Mason is on morning rounds when he reaches a patient scheduled for 10am medications. Among these is Keflex, 1.5 G in 50 mL of a 5% Dextrose solution. The pharmacy recommends that this preparation be administered over thirty minutes. As he adjusts the IV pump, Mason ponders, “To ensure correct dosage delivery, what should the IV pump’s infusion rate be in mL/hour?”

5. Early in the morning, Nurse Jackson is preparing the 10am medications for his patient. Included in the schedule is Keflex, 1.5 G mixed in 50 mL of a 5% Dextrose solution. The pharmacy suggests administering this preparation over a thirty-minute period. Jackson notices the IV tubing on his unit delivers 15 gtts per milliliter. As he sets up the IV, Jackson ponders, “What should be the correct rate of flow in drops per minute for this infusion?”

6. Nurse Sandra is reviewing a new order for her patient. The instruction is to infuse 500 ml of 5% Dextrose in Normal Saline, with an additional 20 MEq of KCl added to the solution, over the next four hours. As she prepares the solution and sets the IV pump, Sandra wonders, “What should be the appropriate infusion rate for this order in mL/hour?”

7. Nurse Jake is attending to a patient who has an order to receive an infusion of 100 mL of D51/2NS with 10MEq of KCl. The infusion is supposed to be administered over the next thirty minutes. As Jake prepares to set the IV pump, he ponders, “What should be the correct infusion rate in mL/hour for this medication?”

8. Nurse Olivia is taking care of a patient who has been admitted due to a head injury. The physician’s order stipulates that the patient should receive D5NS at a rate of 25 mL/hour. The available IV tubing in the unit has a calibration of 10gtt/mL. As Olivia prepares to adjust the IV flow, she wonders, “What should be the correct rate of flow for this patient, expressed in drops per minute?”

9. Nurse George is getting ready to start an IV infusion for a patient. The physician’s order is to administer 1000 mL of D5W over the next eight hours. The IV tubing George is using delivers 15gtt/min. As he’s setting up the IV, he wonders, “What should be the correct rate of flow for this infusion?”

10. In the midst of her afternoon rounds, Nurse Alice receives a new medication order for her patient. It calls for 0.25g of Tetracycline. On checking the medication cabinet, Alice sees that the available Tetracycline solution contains 50mg per mL. As she prepares to draw the medication, she questions, “How many mL’s of this solution will I need to administer to deliver the ordered dose?”

Answers & Rationales

1. Solution:

First, we need to calculate the rate of the infusion in mL/min, as the pharmacy has instructed Nurse Lisa to administer the 100 mL Keflex solution over a 30-minute period:

Rate = Volume / Time
Rate = 100 mL / 30 min
Rate = 3.33 mL/min

The drip factor of the IV tubing is 10 gtt/mL, so we can calculate the drip rate by multiplying the rate in mL/min by the drip factor:

Drip rate = Rate * Drip factor
Drip rate = 3.33 mL/min * 10 gtt/mL
Drip rate = 33.3 gtt/min

Therefore, Nurse Lisa should set the IV to administer the Keflex at a rate of approximately 33 gtt/min (rounding to the nearest whole number).

2. Solution:

The volume of the D5W solution that Nurse David has is 1000 mL, and the physician has instructed him to administer this over an 8-hour period.

We can calculate the rate in mL/hour:

Rate = Volume / Time
Rate = 1000 mL / 8 hours
Rate = 125 mL/hour

Therefore, Nurse David should set the IV pump to administer the D5W solution at a rate of 125 mL/hour.

3. Solution:

Nurse Hannah can calculate the flow rate with the following formula:

Flow rate (in gtt/min) = (Total volume (in ml) / Time (in min)) * Drop factor (in gtt/ml)

First, we need to convert the hours to minutes since the flow rate is needed in drops per minute.

The time is given as 8 hours, and there are 60 minutes in 1 hour, so:

Time = 8 hours * 60 minutes/hour = 480 minutes

Then, we substitute the given values into the formula:

Flow rate (in gtt/min) = (1000 ml / 480 min) * 10 gtt/ml

Next, let’s calculate the flow rate:

Flow rate = (2.0833 ml/min) * 10 gtt/ml = 20.833 gtt/min

However, we can’t really have a fraction of a drop, so we should round this to the nearest whole number. Therefore, the flow rate should be approximately 21 gtt/min.

So, Nurse Hannah should set the IV drip rate to 21 drops per minute to deliver 1000 ml of D5W solution over the next eight hours.

4. Solution:

The infusion rate can be calculated by using the formula:

Infusion rate (in ml/hour) = Total volume (in ml) / Time (in hours)

First, we need to convert the time from minutes to hours since the infusion rate is needed in ml/hour.

The time is given as 30 minutes, and there are 60 minutes in 1 hour, so:

Time = 30 minutes / 60 minutes/hour = 0.5 hours

Then, we substitute the given values into the formula:

Infusion rate (in ml/hour) = 50 ml / 0.5 hours

Finally, let’s calculate the infusion rate:

Infusion rate = 100 ml/hour

Therefore, Nurse Mason should set the IV pump’s infusion rate to 100 ml/hour to administer 1.5 G of Keflex in 50 mL of a 5% Dextrose solution over thirty minutes.

5. Solution:

Nurse Jackson can calculate the flow rate using the following formula:

Flow rate (in gtt/min) = (Total volume (in ml) / Time (in min)) * Drop factor (in gtt/ml)

First, let’s keep the time in minutes since the flow rate is to be calculated in drops per minute.

The time is given as 30 minutes, so there’s no need for conversion:

Time = 30 minutes

Then, we substitute the given values into the formula:

Flow rate (in gtt/min) = (50 ml / 30 min) * 15 gtt/ml

Next, let’s calculate the flow rate:

Flow rate = (1.6667 ml/min) * 15 gtt/ml = 25 gtt/min

Because you can’t have a fraction of a drop, the flow rate should be rounded to the nearest whole number, which is 25 gtt/min.

So, Nurse Jackson should set the IV drip rate to 25 drops per minute to administer 1.5 G of Keflex mixed in 50 mL of a 5% Dextrose solution over a thirty-minute period.

6. Solution:

Nurse Sandra can calculate the infusion rate using the formula:

Infusion rate (in ml/hour) = Total volume (in ml) / Time (in hours)

The total volume to be infused is 500 ml, and the time frame is four hours.

Substitute these values into the formula:

Infusion rate (in ml/hour) = 500 ml / 4 hours

Next, let’s calculate the infusion rate:

Infusion rate = 125 ml/hour

Therefore, Nurse Sandra should set the IV pump’s infusion rate to 125 ml/hour to infuse 500 ml of 5% Dextrose in Normal Saline, with an additional 20 MEq of KCl, over the next four hours.

7. Solution:

Nurse Jake can determine the infusion rate using the following formula:

Infusion rate (in ml/hour) = Total volume (in ml) / Time (in hours)

First, the time needs to be converted from minutes to hours because the desired rate is in ml/hour.

The time is given as 30 minutes, and there are 60 minutes in 1 hour, so:

Time = 30 minutes / 60 minutes/hour = 0.5 hours

Then, we substitute the given values into the formula:

Infusion rate (in ml/hour) = 100 ml / 0.5 hours

Now, let’s calculate the infusion rate:

Infusion rate = 200 ml/hour

Therefore, Nurse Jake should set the IV pump’s infusion rate to 200 ml/hour to administer 100 mL of D51/2NS with 10MEq of KCl over the next thirty minutes.

8. Solution:

Nurse Olivia can calculate the flow rate using the following formula:

Flow rate (in gtt/min) = (Volume in ml/hour / 60 minutes) * Drop factor (in gtt/ml)

The volume is given as 25 ml/hour, and the drop factor is 10 gtt/ml.

Substitute these values into the formula:

Flow rate (in gtt/min) = (25 ml/hour / 60 minutes) * 10 gtt/ml

Next, let’s calculate the flow rate:

Flow rate = (0.4167 ml/min) * 10 gtt/ml = 4.167 gtt/min

Since we can’t have a fraction of a drop, the flow rate should be rounded to the nearest whole number, which gives us approximately 4 gtt/min.

So, Nurse Olivia should set the IV drip rate to 4 drops per minute to administer D5NS at a rate of 25 mL/hour.

9. Solution:

Nurse George can calculate the flow rate with the following formula:

Flow rate (in gtt/min) = (Total volume (in ml) / Time (in min)) * Drop factor (in gtt/ml)

First, we need to convert the hours to minutes since the flow rate is needed in drops per minute.

The time is given as 8 hours, and there are 60 minutes in 1 hour, so:

Time = 8 hours * 60 minutes/hour = 480 minutes

Then, we substitute the given values into the formula:

Flow rate (in gtt/min) = (1000 ml / 480 min) * 15 gtt/ml

Next, let’s calculate the flow rate:

Flow rate = (2.0833 ml/min) * 15 gtt/ml = 31.25 gtt/min

However, we can’t really have a fraction of a drop, so we should round this to the nearest whole number. Therefore, the flow rate should be approximately 31 gtt/min.

So, Nurse George should set the IV drip rate to 31 drops per minute to deliver 1000 ml of D5W solution over the next eight hours.

10. Solution:

Nurse Alice can calculate the volume needed by using the following formula:

Volume (in mL) = Dose required (in mg) / Concentration of solution (in mg/mL)

First, we need to convert the ordered dose from grams to milligrams, since the concentration of the solution is given in milligrams:

0.25 grams = 0.25 * 1000 = 250 milligrams

Then, we substitute the given values into the formula:

Volume (in mL) = 250 mg / 50 mg/mL

Finally, let’s calculate the volume:

Volume = 5 mL

Therefore, Nurse Alice should draw up 5 mL of the Tetracycline solution to administer the ordered dose of 0.25 g.