Drug Dosage Calculation Exam 13

Practice Mode

Welcome to your Drug Dosage Calculation Exam 13! This exam is carefully curated to help you consolidate your knowledge and gain deeper understanding on the topic.

 

βœ” Exam Details

  • Number of Questions: 10 items
  • Mode: Practice Mode

βœ” Exam Instructions

  1. Practice Mode: This mode aims to facilitate effective learning and review.
  2. Instant Feedback: After each question, the correct answer along with an explanation will be revealed. This is to help you understand the reasoning behind the correct answer, helping to reinforce your learning.
  3. Time Limit: There is no time limit for this exam. Take your time to understand each question and the corresponding choices.

βœ” Tips For Success

  • Read each question carefully. Take your time and don't rush.
  • Understand the rationale behind each answer. This will not only help you during this exam, but also assist in reinforcing your learning.
  • Don't be discouraged by incorrect answers. Use them as an opportunity to learn and improve.
  • Take breaks if you need them. It's not a race, and your understanding is what's most important.
  • Keep a positive attitude and believe in your ability to succeed.

Remember, this exam is not just a test of your knowledge, but also an opportunity to enhance your understanding and skills. Enjoy the learning journey!

 

Click 'Start Exam' when you're ready to begin. Best of luck!

πŸ’‘ Hint

Start by converting the ordered dose from grams to milligrams, as 1 gram equals 1000 milligrams. Then, determine how many tablets will provide the desired dose, based on the strength of the available medication.

1 / 10

1. Nurse Emily is prepping medications for her morning rounds when she comes across an order for 0.1 gram of a certain medication. The available tablets on the unit are each 100 mg. As she gets ready to dispense the medication, Emily wonders, "What amount of this medication will I need to administer to fulfill the ordered dosage?"

πŸ’‘ Hint

Simply divide the total dose required by the strength of each tablet to find out how many tablets should be administered.

2 / 10

2. Nurse Liam is preparing medication for his patient, who has an order for 800,000 units of potassium penicillin. Checking the medication cart, Liam finds that the available potassium penicillin tablets are each 400,000 units. As he prepares to dispense the medication, he wonders, "How many tablets should I give to meet the ordered dose?"

πŸ’‘ Hint

To find the correct number of tablets, first convert the ordered dose from grams to milligrams, knowing that 1 gram equals 1000 milligrams. Then, divide this by the strength of each tablet to find the number of tablets to administer.

3 / 10

3. Nurse Bella is taking care of a patient with an order for Azulfidine. The prescription calls for two grams every twelve hours. The medication tray on the ward has Azulfidine tablets, each containing 500 mg. As she prepares to administer the medication, Bella wonders, "How many tablets should I give to fulfill the ordered dosage?"

πŸ’‘ Hint

First, convert the ordered dose from grams to milligrams, knowing that 1 gram equals 1000 milligrams. Then, determine the number of tablets that will provide the correct dose based on the strength of the available medication.

4 / 10

4. Nurse Jenna is organizing her morning medication pass when she sees an order for 0.05 grams of Imipramine HCL. The medication cabinet contains Imipramine HCL in 50 mg tablets. As Jenna readies the dose, she wonders, "How many of these tablets should I administer to fulfill the ordered dose?"

πŸ’‘ Hint

To find the right volume, divide the total dosage ordered by the concentration of the medication available. This will give you the volume in milliliters that you should administer.

5 / 10

5. Nurse Thomas is assigned to a patient who is in severe pain. An order comes in for Dilaudid, 3 mg to be administered intramuscularly. The medication cupboard holds vials of Dilaudid with a concentration of 2 mg/mL. As he prepares to draw up the medication, Thomas wonders, "What volume should I administer to deliver the ordered dosage?"

πŸ’‘ Hint

Use the conversion factor of 1 grain to around 64.8 milligrams to convert the prescribed dose from grains to milligrams. Then, calculate the number of capsules needed based on the medicine's available strength. Here, the available and required strengths are similar, leading to the use of 1 capsule.

6 / 10

6. Nurse Jack is preparing medications and encounters an order for 1 Β½ grains of Sodium Seconal. The available Sodium Seconal capsules in the medication cart are each labeled as 100 mg. Using a more precise conversion factor for grains, Jack calculates the correct amount and prepares to dispense the medicine.

πŸ’‘ Hint

Start by converting the ordered dose from milligrams to micrograms, since 1 milligram equals 1000 micrograms. Then, determine the number of tablets that will provide the correct dose based on the strength of the available medication.

7 / 10

7. Nurse Sophia is reviewing the medication list for her morning rounds and comes across an order for Premarin 1.25 mg for one of her patients. Upon checking the medication cabinet, she finds that the available Premarin tablets each contain 625 mcg. Preparing to administer the medication, Sophia wonders, "How many of these tablets should I give to meet the ordered dose?"

πŸ’‘ Hint

To calculate the correct number of tablets to administer, divide the total dose required (in units) by the strength (in units) of each tablet.

8 / 10

8. In the evening medication round, Nurse Ethan is serving a patient who has an order for 1,200,000 units of potassium penicillin. On the medication trolley, Ethan finds that the available potassium penicillin tablets each contain 400,000 units. As he dispenses the medicine, Ethan wonders, "How many of these tablets should I give to provide the ordered dose?"

πŸ’‘ Hint

To find the correct number of tablets, first convert the ordered dose from grams to milligrams, knowing that 1 gram equals 1000 milligrams. Then, divide this by the strength of each tablet to find the number of tablets to administer.

9 / 10

9. Nurse Noah is caring for a patient who has an order for Azulfidine. The order specifies 1.5 grams every twelve hours. The medication tray on the unit holds Azulfidine tablets, each containing 500 mg. As Noah prepares to administer the medication, he wonders, "How many of these tablets should I give to fulfill the ordered dose?"

πŸ’‘ Hint

Remember that 1 mg is equal to 1000 mcg. Use this to convert the ordered dose and the available dosage strength to the same units, then determine how many tablets are needed to provide the correct dose.

10 / 10

10. As part of the morning medication pass, Nurse Eli has an order to administer 200 mcg of Ergotrate maleate to a patient. He has tablets available, each with a dosage strength of 0.2 mg. Eli is considering, "How many of these tablets should I give to meet the ordered dosage?"

Exam Mode

Welcome to your Drug Dosage Calculation Exam 13! This exam is carefully designed to provide you with a realistic test-taking experience, preparing you for the pressures of an actual nursing exam.

 

βœ” Exam Details

  • Number of Questions: 10 items
  • Mode: Exam Mode

βœ” Exam Instructions

  1. Exam Mode: This mode is intended to simulate the environment of an actual exam. Questions and choices will be presented one at a time.
  2. Time Limit: Each question must be answered within 90 seconds. The entire exam should be completed within 15 minutes.
  3. Feedback and Grading: Upon completion of the exam, you will be able to see your grade and the correct answers to all questions. This will allow you to evaluate your performance and understand areas for improvement.

βœ” Tips For Success

  • Read each question carefully. You have 90 seconds per question, so make sure you understand the question before selecting your answer.
  • Pace yourself. Remember, you have 15 minutes in total, so try to maintain a steady rhythm.
  • Focus on one question at a time. Try not to worry about the questions to come.
  • Stay calm under pressure. Use your knowledge and trust your instincts.
  • Remember, it's not just about the score, but about the learning process.

This exam is not only a measurement of your current understanding, but also a valuable learning tool to prepare you for your future nursing career. Click 'Start Exam' when you're ready to begin. Good luck!

1 / 10

1. Nurse Liam is preparing medication for his patient, who has an order for 800,000 units of potassium penicillin. Checking the medication cart, Liam finds that the available potassium penicillin tablets are each 400,000 units. As he prepares to dispense the medication, he wonders, "How many tablets should I give to meet the ordered dose?"

2 / 10

2. Nurse Jack is preparing medications and encounters an order for 1 Β½ grains of Sodium Seconal. The available Sodium Seconal capsules in the medication cart are each labeled as 100 mg. Using a more precise conversion factor for grains, Jack calculates the correct amount and prepares to dispense the medicine.

3 / 10

3. Nurse Jenna is organizing her morning medication pass when she sees an order for 0.05 grams of Imipramine HCL. The medication cabinet contains Imipramine HCL in 50 mg tablets. As Jenna readies the dose, she wonders, "How many of these tablets should I administer to fulfill the ordered dose?"

4 / 10

4. Nurse Noah is caring for a patient who has an order for Azulfidine. The order specifies 1.5 grams every twelve hours. The medication tray on the unit holds Azulfidine tablets, each containing 500 mg. As Noah prepares to administer the medication, he wonders, "How many of these tablets should I give to fulfill the ordered dose?"

5 / 10

5. Nurse Sophia is reviewing the medication list for her morning rounds and comes across an order for Premarin 1.25 mg for one of her patients. Upon checking the medication cabinet, she finds that the available Premarin tablets each contain 625 mcg. Preparing to administer the medication, Sophia wonders, "How many of these tablets should I give to meet the ordered dose?"

6 / 10

6. Nurse Bella is taking care of a patient with an order for Azulfidine. The prescription calls for two grams every twelve hours. The medication tray on the ward has Azulfidine tablets, each containing 500 mg. As she prepares to administer the medication, Bella wonders, "How many tablets should I give to fulfill the ordered dosage?"

7 / 10

7. Nurse Emily is prepping medications for her morning rounds when she comes across an order for 0.1 gram of a certain medication. The available tablets on the unit are each 100 mg. As she gets ready to dispense the medication, Emily wonders, "What amount of this medication will I need to administer to fulfill the ordered dosage?"

8 / 10

8. As part of the morning medication pass, Nurse Eli has an order to administer 200 mcg of Ergotrate maleate to a patient. He has tablets available, each with a dosage strength of 0.2 mg. Eli is considering, "How many of these tablets should I give to meet the ordered dosage?"

9 / 10

9. Nurse Thomas is assigned to a patient who is in severe pain. An order comes in for Dilaudid, 3 mg to be administered intramuscularly. The medication cupboard holds vials of Dilaudid with a concentration of 2 mg/mL. As he prepares to draw up the medication, Thomas wonders, "What volume should I administer to deliver the ordered dosage?"

10 / 10

10. In the evening medication round, Nurse Ethan is serving a patient who has an order for 1,200,000 units of potassium penicillin. On the medication trolley, Ethan finds that the available potassium penicillin tablets each contain 400,000 units. As he dispenses the medicine, Ethan wonders, "How many of these tablets should I give to provide the ordered dose?"

Text Mode

Text ModeΒ – Text version of the exam

Questions

1. Nurse Thomas is assigned to a patient who is in severe pain. An order comes in for Dilaudid, 3 mg to be administered intramuscularly. The medication cupboard holds vials of Dilaudid with a concentration of 2 mg/mL. As he prepares to draw up the medication, Thomas wonders, “What volume should I administer to deliver the ordered dosage?”

2. Nurse Emily is prepping medications for her morning rounds when she comes across an order for 0.1 gram of a certain medication. The available tablets on the unit are each 100 mg. As she gets ready to dispense the medication, Emily wonders, “What amount of this medication will I need to administer to fulfill the ordered dosage?”

3. Nurse Liam is preparing medication for his patient, who has an order for 800,000 units of potassium penicillin. Checking the medication cart, Liam finds that the available potassium penicillin tablets are each 400,000 units. As he prepares to dispense the medication, he wonders, “How many tablets should I give to meet the ordered dose?”

4. Nurse Bella is taking care of a patient with an order for Azulfidine. The prescription calls for two grams every twelve hours. The medication tray on the ward has Azulfidine tablets, each containing 500 mg. As she prepares to administer the medication, Bella wonders, “How many tablets should I give to fulfill the ordered dosage?”

5. In the evening medication round, Nurse Ethan is serving a patient who has an order for 1,200,000 units of potassium penicillin. On the medication trolley, Ethan finds that the available potassium penicillin tablets each contain 400,000 units. As he dispenses the medicine, Ethan wonders, “How many of these tablets should I give to provide the ordered dose?”

6. Nurse Sophia is reviewing the medication list for her morning rounds and comes across an order for Premarin 1.25 mg for one of her patients. Upon checking the medication cabinet, she finds that the available Premarin tablets each contain 625 mcg. Preparing to administer the medication, Sophia wonders, “How many of these tablets should I give to meet the ordered dose?”

7. Nurse Noah is caring for a patient who has an order for Azulfidine. The order specifies 1.5 grams every twelve hours. The medication tray on the unit holds Azulfidine tablets, each containing 500 mg. As Noah prepares to administer the medication, he wonders, “How many of these tablets should I give to fulfill the ordered dose?”

8. Nurse Jack is preparing medications and encounters an order for 1 Β½ grains of Sodium Seconal. The available Sodium Seconal capsules in the medication cart are each labeled as 100 mg. Using a more precise conversion factor for grains, Jack calculates the correct amount and prepares to dispense the medicine.

9. Nurse Jenna is organizing her morning medication pass when she sees an order for 0.05 grams of Imipramine HCL. The medication cabinet contains Imipramine HCL in 50 mg tablets. As Jenna readies the dose, she wonders, “How many of these tablets should I administer to fulfill the ordered dose?”

10. As part of the morning medication pass, Nurse Eli has an order to administer 200 mcg of Ergotrate maleate to a patient. He has tablets available, each with a dosage strength of 0.2 mg. Eli is considering, “How many of these tablets should I give to meet the ordered dosage?”

Answers & Rationales

1. Solution:

Nurse Thomas can calculate the volume to be administered using the following formula:

Volume (in mL) = Dose required (in mg) / Concentration of solution (in mg/mL)

The ordered dose is 3 mg and the available concentration of the solution is 2 mg/mL.

Substitute these values into the formula:

Volume (in mL) = 3 mg / 2 mg/mL

Now, let’s calculate the volume:

Volume = 1.5 mL

Therefore, Nurse Thomas should administer 1.5 mL of the Dilaudid solution to deliver the ordered dose of 3 mg.

2. Solution:

Nurse Emily can determine the amount of medication needed by first converting the ordered dose from grams to milligrams:

0.1 grams = 0.1 * 1000 = 100 milligrams

The available tablets on the unit are each 100 mg. Given that the dose she needs to administer is also 100 milligrams, she needs to give the patient 1 tablet to fulfill the ordered dosage.

Therefore, Nurse Emily should administer one tablet of this medication to deliver the ordered dose of 0.1 gram.

3. Solution:

Nurse Liam can determine the number of tablets needed by using the following formula:

Number of tablets = Ordered dose (in units) / Tablet strength (in units)

The ordered dose is 800,000 units and the strength of each available tablet is 400,000 units.

Substitute these values into the formula:

Number of tablets = 800,000 units / 400,000 units

Now, let’s calculate the number of tablets:

Number of tablets = 2

Therefore, Nurse Liam should administer two tablets of potassium penicillin to deliver the ordered dose of 800,000 units.

4. Solution:

Nurse Bella can determine the number of tablets needed by using the following formula:

Number of tablets = Ordered dose (in mg) / Tablet strength (in mg)

First, she needs to convert the ordered dose from grams to milligrams, since the strength of the tablets is given in milligrams:

2 grams = 2 * 1000 = 2000 milligrams

Then, substitute these values into the formula:

Number of tablets = 2000 mg / 500 mg

Now, let’s calculate the number of tablets:

Number of tablets = 4

Therefore, Nurse Bella should administer four tablets of Azulfidine to fulfill the ordered dosage of two grams.

5. Solution:

Nurse Ethan can determine the number of tablets needed using the following formula:

Number of tablets = Ordered dose (in units) / Tablet strength (in units)

The ordered dose is 1,200,000 units, and each available tablet has a strength of 400,000 units.

Substitute these values into the formula:

Number of tablets = 1,200,000 units / 400,000 units

Now, let’s calculate the number of tablets:

Number of tablets = 3

Therefore, Nurse Ethan should administer three tablets of potassium penicillin to deliver the ordered dose of 1,200,000 units.

6. Solution:

Nurse Sophia can calculate the number of tablets needed using the following formula:

Number of tablets = Ordered dose (in mcg) / Tablet strength (in mcg)

First, she needs to convert the ordered dose from milligrams (mg) to micrograms (mcg), since the strength of the tablets is given in micrograms. There are 1,000 micrograms in a milligram, so:

1.25 mg = 1.25 * 1000 = 1250 mcg

Then, she substitutes these values into the formula:

Number of tablets = 1250 mcg / 625 mcg

Now, let’s calculate the number of tablets:

Number of tablets = 2

Therefore, Nurse Sophia should administer two tablets of Premarin to fulfill the ordered dosage of 1.25 mg.

7. Solution:

Nurse Noah can determine the number of tablets needed by using the following formula:

Number of tablets = Ordered dose (in mg) / Tablet strength (in mg)

First, he needs to convert the ordered dose from grams to milligrams, as the strength of the tablets is given in milligrams:

1.5 grams = 1.5 * 1000 = 1500 milligrams

Then, he substitutes these values into the formula:

Number of tablets = 1500 mg / 500 mg

Now, let’s calculate the number of tablets:

Number of tablets = 3

Therefore, Nurse Noah should administer three tablets of Azulfidine to fulfill the ordered dosage of 1.5 grams.

8. Solution:

To convert the order from grains to milligrams, Nurse Jack can use the conversion factor that 1 grain is approximately equal to 64.8 milligrams.

So, the ordered dose in milligrams can be calculated as:

Ordered dose (in mg) = Ordered dose (in grains) * Conversion factor (in mg/grain)

Let’s substitute these values into the formula:

Ordered dose (in mg) = 1.5 grains * 64.8 mg/grain

Ordered dose = 97.2 mg

The available Sodium Seconal capsules each contain 100 mg. Given that the calculated dose is 97.2 mg, which is very close to 100 mg, Jack will need to give the patient 1 capsule to meet the ordered dose.

Therefore, Nurse Jack should administer one capsule of Sodium Seconal to deliver the ordered dose of 1 Β½ grains. Please note that this approximation should be verified with the prescriber or a pharmacist, as it slightly exceeds the ordered dose.

9. Solution:

Hint: First, convert the ordered dose from grams to milligrams, knowing that 1 gram equals 1000 milligrams. Then, determine the number of tablets that will provide the correct dose based on the strength of the available medication.

Nurse Jenna can calculate the number of tablets needed using the following formula:

Number of tablets = Ordered dose (in mg) / Tablet strength (in mg)

First, she needs to convert the ordered dose from grams to milligrams, as the strength of the tablets is given in milligrams:

0.05 grams = 0.05 * 1000 = 50 milligrams

Then, she substitutes these values into the formula:

Number of tablets = 50 mg / 50 mg

Now, let’s calculate the number of tablets:

Number of tablets = 1

Therefore, Nurse Jenna should administer one tablet of Imipramine HCL to fulfill the ordered dosage of 0.05 grams.

10. Solution:

Nurse Eli can calculate the number of tablets needed using the following formula:

Number of tablets = Ordered dose (in mcg) / Tablet strength (in mcg)

First, he needs to convert the tablet strength from milligrams (mg) to micrograms (mcg) since the ordered dose is given in micrograms. There are 1000 micrograms in a milligram, so:

0.2 mg = 0.2 * 1000 = 200 mcg

Then, he substitutes these values into the formula:

Number of tablets = 200 mcg / 200 mcg

Now, let’s calculate the number of tablets:

Number of tablets = 1

Therefore, Nurse Eli should administer one tablet of Ergotrate maleate to fulfill the ordered dosage of 200 mcg.